Making decisions in a dangerous world

January 22nd, 2010

Of the twenty most costly catastrophes since 1970, more than half have occurred since 2001.  Is the world simply going to fast and is the rapidity of events the reason for bad decisions?  We live in a time when we have more information when we make decisions. Neuroscience and brain research have given us powerful new tools to help us decide.  The pain of the past eighteen months is said to have given us a kind of reset, to allow us to take more reasoned actions.  Does any of this matter?  Or is there something at the intersection of economics, psychology, public policy and finance that is simply dysfunctional?  Thirty top scholars, innovators and Nobel laureates takes on these issues in a The Irrational Economist: Making Decisions in a Dangerous World edited by Wharton Risk Center Managing Director Erwann Michel-Kerjan.  My conversation with Erwann Michel-Kerjan:

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