The Future We Want

February 8th, 2016
16b670ba-9d80-4b18-95f2-77a8f2413d51.jpgThink about how much the world has changed in just the past 25 years and then think about how little our politics has changed.  Not just that we’re still talking about Clinton and Bush, but that the issues, the ideas and the ways in which they are discussed has not changed.  One does not have to throw out the principles of our Founders to retool the political process.  In fact, it is precisely those tools that should be used to reshape everything about our politics. 

The good news is that this effort is being midwifed by young people with new values, who believe in transparency and honesty as opposed to duplicity.  Who believe in fairness not obfuscation. Who see that the future is not about fixing the old car, but blowing it up and taking Tesla or Uber.  

We are at what some have called the millennial moment. When power shifts from parents to children. When adults brought up in a different era realize they've lost touch with what's going on. 

Clearly, "there's something happening here" and few understand it better than journalists Sarah Leonard (The Nation) and Bhaskar Sunkara (Jacobin,) author of The Future We Want: Radical Ideas for the New Century.

My conversation with Sarah Leonard and Bhaskar Sunkara: